<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Lucida Grande" LANG="0" SIZE="3">well, i had said i wouldn't reply on this, but i think that<BR>
this post will still manage to be productive.&nbsp;  i hope so...<BR>
<BR>
***<BR>
<BR>
aristotle said:<BR>
</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Lucida Grande" LANG="0" SIZE="3">&gt;&nbsp;&nbsp;  If every implementor teases a different intent <BR>
&gt;&nbsp;&nbsp;  out the same document, the user loses.<BR>
</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Lucida Grande" LANG="0" SIZE="3"><BR>
well, yes.&nbsp;  but that's pretty obvious, isn't it?<BR>
<BR>
there needs to be agreement among implementers.<BR>
i would think that goes without saying.<BR>
<BR>
however, implementers can reach agreement easily,<BR>
by leaving users out in the cold, brushing them off<BR>
with a "you will need to follow the spec" which seems<BR>
-- if i understand markdown's cornerstone correctly --<BR>
to be outside gruber's comfort range for his creation...<BR>
<BR>
nobody benefits from _true_ ambiguity.&nbsp;  kill that off...<BR>
<BR>
but if you cannot be clever enough to allow "corner" cases<BR>
to be resolved _however_different_users_intended_them_<BR>
-- especially if those different intentions could be _easily_<BR>
understood by a naive person viewing them in plain text --<BR>
you need to go back to the drafting table and do more work.<BR>
<BR>
in other words, the same input must create the same output.<BR>
<BR>
but if people express different output using _similar_ input,<BR>
then you need to work to find a way to differentiate the input,<BR>
and not simply think that you can tell one of them to change...<BR>
<BR>
so before considering two things as "the same", work _hard_<BR>
to see if there's some way -- any way -- to differentiate 'em...<BR>
<BR>
i mean, that's _my_ opinion, but my opinion counts much less<BR>
than those of the implementers, and far less than gruber's...<BR>
<BR>
the thing is, i like the _idea_ of markdown, which should not<BR>
be surprising, since i'd been working on my own non-markup<BR>
form of markup (for project gutenberg's e-texts in particular)<BR>
before markdown was invented.&nbsp;  since i couldn't "write a spec"<BR>
-- as my target documents are already widely propagated --<BR>
i had to _get_clever_ to tease out the different interpretations.<BR>
not only did it lead to code that's stronger _and_ more flexible, <BR>
but i found the challenge to be stimulating _and_ productive...<BR>
<BR>
</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Lucida Grande" LANG="0" SIZE="3"><BR>
&gt;&nbsp;&nbsp;  Why then does the fallacious argument that <BR>
&gt;&nbsp;&nbsp;  a spec would represent a loss for the user continue?<BR>
<BR>
aren't you loading the dice by labeling it as "fallacious"?<BR>
<BR>
i'm not necessarily arguing that _any_ spec would do that.<BR>
but some might...&nbsp;  most especially by some implementers...<BR>
and according to markdown, users can't be wrong, can they?<BR>
<BR>
so far, i've agreed with every aspect of michel's take on this...<BR>
<BR>
-bowerbird<BR>
</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Lucida Grande" LANG="0" SIZE="3"></FONT><BR><BR><BR>**************<BR>It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms, and advice on AOL Money &amp; Finance.<BR>      (http://money.aol.com/tax?NCID=aolprf00030000000001)</HTML>