<div><br></div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Mar 17, 2010 at 8:37 PM, Arno Hautala <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:arno@alum.wpi.edu">arno@alum.wpi.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">


<br>
Me?  I&#39;m happy with PHPMDExtra.  And really that&#39;s just for the<br>
footnotes and definition lists.  Plenty of other forks support both.<br>
The headache is that so many support one convention but not another.<br>
It also emphasizes the point that this is Markdown, not HTML.  It<br>
can&#39;t and shouldn&#39;t support everything.  Take &quot;Markdown in Python&quot;.<br>
Does a Markdown implementation really need to be able to output an<br>
image gallery [2], or RSS [3]?  Even the table syntax used by MDE<br>
gives me bad vibes.  If your table is simple enough to be defined in<br>
MDE, there&#39;s probably a better way to convey that data.  If it&#39;s<br>
complicated enough to stretch what MDE can do, you should probably<br>
just code the table.  Markdown is not always the right tool for the<br>
job.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>For the record, we are dropping the Imagelinks extension completely from Pyrton-Markdown. It never actually worked without some hard-to-find no-longer-maintained third party code. It will be gone with the next release. Both it and the RSS extension were proof of concepts to show what our extension API &quot;could&quot; do - not that they should necessarily be something we should do. They ended up being distributed with the core project ever since and forgotten about. We recently deleted the Imagelinks extension when someone complained it didn&#39;t work -- which reminded us it existed.  We should probably do the same with the RSS extension. Especially now that we have other, useful extensions (i.e.: extra [1]).</div>

<div><br></div><div>In fact, I&#39;ve recently expounded [2] on why I think my code highlighting extension [3] is no longer necessary, but that is probably one of our most used extensions, so we&#39;ll continue to maintain it for the time being.</div>

</div><div><br></div><div>[1]: <a href="http://www.freewisdom.org/projects/python-markdown/Extra">http://www.freewisdom.org/projects/python-markdown/Extra</a></div><div>[2]: <a href="http://achinghead.com/archive/88/syntax-highlighting-web/">http://achinghead.com/archive/88/syntax-highlighting-web/</a></div>

<div>[3]: <a href="http://www.freewisdom.org/projects/python-markdown/CodeHilite">http://www.freewisdom.org/projects/python-markdown/CodeHilite</a></div><div><br></div><div>So, I have to agree with Arno here. Adding more doesn&#39;t necessarily make Markdown better. We&#39;ve already tried it (as have many implementations) and it doesn&#39;t always work. For example I wish I never would have released my wikilinks extension. It has resulted in more feature creep type of requests that anything else in the project. Personally, I don&#39;t even like wikilinks for any purpose. But I digress.</div>

<div><br></div><div>The one thing we are proud of about Python-Markdown is the ease with which anyone can write extensions of their own [4]. Although not quite as versatile, PHP Markdown has started to follow suit (although mostly undocumented - search the list archives for clues). Personally, I think this is where implementations should look to move next - not expanding the syntax, but providing an API so that it&#39;s users can in their own code to meet the specific needs of their specific projects.</div>

<div><br></div><div>[4]: <a href="http://www.freewisdom.org/projects/python-markdown/Writing_Extensions">http://www.freewisdom.org/projects/python-markdown/Writing_Extensions</a></div><br>-- <br>----<br>\X/ /-\ `/ |_ /-\ |\|<br>

Waylan Limberg<br>