<br clear="all"><br><br><br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><br>
<br>
Position      Team              P      GD      PTS<br>
1                 Man Utd         31     46      67<br>
2                 Arsenal          31     40       67<br>
3                 Chelsea          29     42      64<br>
4                 Tottenham     30     26      55<br>
5                 Liverpool       31     19       52<br>
6                 Man City        28     17       50<br>
7                 Aston Villa     29     17       50<br>
8                 Everton          30      6       45<br>
9                 Birmingham   30     -3       44<br>
10               Fulham           29      0       38<br>
11               Stoke              30     -6       36<br>
12               Sunderland    30     -6       34<br>
13               Blackburn      29     -17     34<br>
14               Bolton             31     -20     32<br>
15               Wigan             31     -30     31<br>
16               Wolves            30     -24     28<br>
17               West Ham       30     -14     27<br>
18               Burnley           31     -33     24<br>
19               Hull                 30     -35     24<br>
20               Portsmouth    30     -25     13<br>
<br>
It should be possible to do without having to use html. For more complex tables (eg multiple lines in spanning cells, tables within tables) you are getting into a different kettle of fish - I can see requiring html for that.<br>
</blockquote><div><br><br><br> Agreed.  This is the sort of thing that I do right now with MMD&#39;s tables. Doing nested tables in HTML by hand is awful.  My response to nested tables is &quot;Please don&#39;t&quot;  I know some layout mavins  use this to control presentation.  I prefer &lt;div&gt; + CSS.  I often use this construct to add illustration to an article &lt;div class=&quot;picture_right_40&quot; which contains an image, a caption, and a ruler line.  It floats right, and is sized to 40% of the width of the containing div.  This allows me to still have text that is readable, without having to remember opening and closing tags beyond the &lt;div&gt; and &lt;/div&gt;<br>
<br>A colleague of mine used tabs for programming indents, and commented that once the indents got the the point where there wasn&#39;t enough line left to work, it was time to abstract.  Pull a chunk out as a subroutine or function.<br>
<br>HTML generally, and in tables in particular, can have too many open tags.  In general I find that not being able to see the close on the same page as the open makes for error prone writing.<br>Unfortunately there is no good way in html to do the equivalent of a subroutine, to abstract it out. We have a plethora of CMS systems to enable us to try to keep the content separate from the presentation, so that we have to do the difficult stuff less often.<br>
<br>MD is a device for enabling the content to be less cluttered.  It&#39;s not full separationg from presentation, but it&#39;s good enough.<br><br>Different people have different itches.  And so MD forks in a multitude of ways.<br>
<br>If someone wants order they have to *want* it enough to put a fair amount of work on it.<br><br>They would have to document the edge cases, badger each developer to fix the bugs, and nudge toward concensus.  Possibly write dialect transform programs to make moving stuff between one dialect and another.<br>
<br>One objection to configuration has been document portability.  Alas we don&#39;t have that now because of the multiple forks.  Mind you adding configuration could well make this problem worse, unless there is an umbrella organization to use configurations to make forks more compatible instead of more different.<br>
</div></div><br>