<div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Jan 1, 2011 at 9:46 PM, ipah <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ipah@me.com">ipah@me.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div><div>Yes the idea of Markdown is exactly what I&#39;m looking for here. Using notepad or something similar with only a few extra characters and having it post processed into the proper format. There is Final Draft, which is horribly clunky, ugly, slow, etc. There is a lot other ones but, I really want something super simple. The issue is to send it to anyone, plain text will NOT work, there are very specific formats. Id rather store everything plain text but should I need to send it somewhere, having it convert to say .fdx or a perfectly formatted pdf.</div>
</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Given that <b><a href="http://celtx.com/">Celtx</a></b> is free and that formated 80 character wide monospaced text has been a standard for handing scripts around in Hollywood since the days where all the typewriters were manual and all the stage-direction minimal, I think you&#39;ll find a mark-up language (that, coincidently, no one you&#39;re likely to send a script to will recognize any <i>faster</i> or more reasonably than straight text formatting), I think the effort is, at best, misplaced. </div>
<div><br></div><div>Every single script processor I&#39;ve ever worked with can take raw text and import it into an editable internal format, then turn around and spit it out again. Every one, from <b>Final Draft</b> to <b>Celtx</b> to <b>Scriptwrite</b>. The newer ones can even manage HTML import/export which lets you put it up on your favourite site with all the CSS bells and whistles you want. There&#39;s not a single producer on Earth who wouldn&#39;t prefer to get the nice, tightly laid out TXT output of a piece of your fave screenwriting software (or even something like <b><a href="http://scripped.com/">Scripped</a></b>) than some bit of text with alien mark-up.</div>
<div><br></div><div>There&#39;s a reason that <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screenplay">the screenplay format is standardized</a>. Essentially, so that five-thousand guys in a hundred cities can write on a dozen forms of typewriter and get out largely compatibly timed chunks of text. That&#39;s not something you generally mess with.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Store your scripts in whatever the native format for your preferred editor is and export it for shipping <i>in whatever form the person intended to read it wants it in.</i> If they want it as a beautiful PDF with a handwriting-like font on pink background, that&#39;s what you export to. At least, if you want them to pick up your spec. The rest of the time, you&#39;ll go with standard text or increasingly simple PDF.</div>
</div><br>-- <br>Alexander Williams (<a href="mailto:thantos@gmail.com" target="_blank">thantos@gmail.com</a>)<br><b><i>Operation BSU</i></b> (<a href="http://operationbsu.org" target="_blank">http://operationbsu.org</a>)<div>
<i>Like a morning show, only interesting. And at night.</i></div><br>