Hi folks,<div><br></div><div>Yesterday I raised an issue about <a href="http://www.freewisdom.org/projects/python-markdown/Tickets/000087">inconsistent preservation of whitespace</a> in Python-Markdown.</div><div><br></div>
<div><div>    &gt;&gt;&gt; import markdown</div><div>    &gt;&gt;&gt; md = markdown.Markdown()</div><div>    &gt;&gt;&gt; md.convert(&#39;Added `&gt;&gt;&gt; ` to signify user input.&#39;)</div><div>    u&#39;&lt;p&gt;Added &lt;code&gt;&amp;gt;&amp;gt;&amp;gt;&lt;/code&gt; to signify user input.&lt;/p&gt;&#39;</div>
</div><div><br></div><div>According to Waylan, all but one of the Markdown implementations drop the trailing slash within the backticks. This seems wrong to me. I don&#39;t buy the argument that since default browser behaviour is to ignore this space, the space is insignificant and can be omitted from the markup generated. This is akin to arguing that lossy compression of audio files is fine since default (i.e. iPod/iPhone) headphones are of low quality and make it impossible to detect the difference between compressed and uncompressed versions.</div>
<div><br></div><div>From a practical standpoint, it should be possible to apply styling to this markup to drastically change its appearance. One could, for example, apply `color` and `background-color` styles to invert the code&#39;s colours. In conjunction with certain `white-space` values this could lead to the following:</div>
<div><br></div><div>Added <font class="Apple-style-span" face="&#39;courier new&#39;, monospace"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="background-color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><font class="Apple-style-span" color="#FFFFFF">&gt;&gt;&gt; </font></span></font> to signify user input.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Given the current implementations, information which is in this case significant has been lost by the time I get my hands on it.</div><div><br></div><div><b>How do others feel about updating what is considered to be the correct behaviour here?</b> Such a change would be backwards compatible since, as mentioned, default browser behaviour is to ignore such spaces anyway. In those rare cases where styling has been applied in order to make this whitespace significant, the change is a reflection of the output&#39;s (improved) fidelity.</div>
<div><br></div><div>David</div>