<div class="gmail_quote"><div>Hi Tommy!</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">I just must say that I have tried Fletcher Penneys version of multi markdown recently.</blockquote>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
The 3.x version seems to me to be very suitable for the task of converting to LaTeX,<br>
which is slightly more complicated than converting to HTML.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Wow! I didn&#39;t know MultiMarkdown, but that is a great hint. Looks very promising and capable. Thank you!</div><div><br></div>
<div>The Markdown entry on Wikipedia</div><div>   <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markdown">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markdown</a></div><div>doesn&#39;t point to</div><div>  <a href="http://fletcherpenney.net/multimarkdown/">http://fletcherpenney.net/multimarkdown/</a></div>
<div>yet. But it probably should.</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
I have tried pandoc, but I find it far more easier to work with multimarkdown.<br>
<br>
You should consider trying it.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div> I use Pandoc for my HaskellDown, because it is a Haskell library. It also is very powerful and impressive, and in my limited experience, I found it very stable and more reliable than e.g. PHP Markdown. Actually, I don&#39;t apply any of its nice features (like automatic toc generation) at all in the default markdownToHaskell converter, I just use all the Pandoc default settings, for the sake of simplicity. But I agree, Tommy, I, too, didn&#39;t find Pandoc itself easily accessible. </div>
<div><br></div><div>Thank you, again.</div><div>Thomas</div></div><br>