<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
    On 15/05/11 01:17 PM, <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Bowerbird@aol.com">Bowerbird@aol.com</a> wrote:
    <blockquote cite="mid:58b17.365714e1.3b0164aa@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4">simon-<br>
          <br>
          i'm not sure persistence will do you much good.<br>
          nobody seems to have a desire to work together.<br>
          which is likely why there are 39 implementations.<br>
          <br>
        </font></font></blockquote>
    Isn't the existence of 39 implementations due to each implementer
    having their own favourite programming/scripting lamguage? And don't
    most (if not all) strive to follow the "canonical" Gruber perl
    markdown implementation? The inability to "work together" as you put
    it is due more th the percieved apathy of the originators of
    markdown in the last few years and the lack of an appointed/accepted
    successor.<br>
    <blockquote cite="mid:58b17.365714e1.3b0164aa@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4">
          an appeal on behalf of readers seems misguided,<br>
          since very few people are reading markdown text.<br>
          <br>
        </font></font></blockquote>
    In my case I use markdown for a personal info management system and
    I read the text as often as the rendered html. But then it is my own
    text and I already know how I intended it to be interpreted.<br>
    <blockquote cite="mid:58b17.365714e1.3b0164aa@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4">
          but a more potent case can be made for _re-use_.<br>
          the more easily content can be remixed, the better.<br>
          <br>
          for my contender in the light-markup derby --<br>
          zen markup language (zml) -- to facilitate re-use,<br>
          my goal is that users can "round-trip" the text...<br>
          <br>
          so if they copy the text out of the .pdf and use it <br>
          to create _another_ .pdf, the two will be identical.<br>
          <br>
          likewise, if they copy the text from a web-browser,<br>
          it will match the .zml file which created that .html.<br>
          <br>
          or copy the text out of one version (.html or .pdf)<br>
          and use it to create the other version, just like that.<br>
          <br>
          i am coming very close in both cases.&nbsp; it'll certainly<br>
          be the case that some global changes will always be<br>
          required to restore the original .zml, but if i get it<br>
          down to just a few, that will be an accomplishment.<br>
          <br>
          -bowerbird<br>
        </font></font>
      <pre wrap=""><font face="arial,helvetica">
</font><fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset><font face="arial,helvetica">
_______________________________________________
Markdown-Discuss mailing list
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Markdown-Discuss@six.pairlist.net">Markdown-Discuss@six.pairlist.net</a>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://six.pairlist.net/mailman/listinfo/markdown-discuss">http://six.pairlist.net/mailman/listinfo/markdown-discuss</a>
</font></pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>