<div><div><span><div><div><div>
            <div><p style="color: #a0a0a0;">On Monday, June 13, 2011 at 2:10 PM, David Parsons wrote:</p><blockquote type="cite"><div>
                    <span><div><div><br>On Jun 13, 2011, at 1:02 PM, Alan Hogan wrote:<br><br><blockquote type="cite"><div>If you don't mind me reviving this issue, I just thought of another  <br>use case in which this bug, in its augmented definition that  <br>includes different list type markers, could rear its head.<br><br>Consider this source document:<br><br>~~~~~~~~<br><br>Pros and Cons:<br><br>+ Tasty<br>+ Can sell wings and hooves as well as meat<br>+ Only I know where to find them (obscene profits!)<br><br>- Endangered<br>- Hard to market as most people will believe to be a hoax<br></div></blockquote><br><br>That's a good example, but it would also require carrying<br>over the item marker which is another thing that's not<br>supported yet (though I would say that it would fall into<br>the "to-be-supported-later" bucket that paying attention<br>to list markers for enumerated lists is already in.)<br><br>And now that I think about it, one problem with a feature<br>that requires class awareness is what happens with a syndication<br>feed that strips away the class arguments and simply spits out<br>vanilla html?   That would be a pretty radical change in meaning<br>from a wire article that's got what looks like one big list with<br>a paragraph break in the middle to the fully cssed webpage that's<br>got the plusses and minuses neatly laid out.   As markdown sits<br>right now, stripping away the css just results in a more vanilla<br>presentation.<br><br>-david parsons</div></div></span></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>You raise a good point, but I don’t think that’s reason to prevent such a feature.</div><div><br></div><div>Some points:</div><div><br></div><div>1. In at least my browser, consecutive ULs actually have a blank line between them.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<a href="http://dl.dropbox.com/u/105727/web/consecutive-uls.html">http://dl.dropbox.com/u/105727/web/consecutive-uls.html</a>&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;(Screenshot of rendering in my browser:&nbsp;<a href="http://cl.ly/2X3Q1x3x172n060M3m2L">http://cl.ly/2X3Q1x3x172n060M3m2L</a>)</div><div><br></div><div>2. Savvy authors writing for RSS-enabled feeds should know not to rely on CSS styles in any fashion, including the speculative kind I suggested.</div><div><br></div>
            </div>
        </div></div></div></span></div></div>