<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
    <title></title>
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
    On 06/25/2011 03:10 PM, <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Bowerbird@aol.com">Bowerbird@aol.com</a> wrote:
    <blockquote cite="mid:85e41.5012a4.3b378ca8@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4">richard said:<br>
          &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; This seems like a bad idea to me. <br>
          <br>
          it still seems like a great idea to me, richard...&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ;+)<br>
        </font></font></blockquote>
    Well, it was your idea :b
    <blockquote cite="mid:85e41.5012a4.3b378ca8@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4">
          <br>
          (i'm responding just for the sake of discussion,<br>
          not because i consider any of this to be "vital".<br>
          so understand that this is all very lighthearted.)<br>
        </font></font></blockquote>
    Same reason I'm responding<br>
    <blockquote cite="mid:85e41.5012a4.3b378ca8@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4">
          <br>
          <br>
          &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; in the mission of Markdown<br>
          <br>
          i was talking about my own system,<br>
          which doesn't give a stinky fart about<br>
          "the mission of markdown", thank you.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; :+)<br>
          <br>
          <br>
          &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; that the content comes first and<br>
          &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; it should never be dictated or <br>
          &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; impacted by the markup.<br>
          <br>
          except the markup is the whole purpose of markdown.<br>
          <br>
          how can the purpose and the mission be inconsistent?<br>
          <br>
          (that's a rhetorical question.&nbsp; just for the discussion.)<br>
        </font></font></blockquote>
    Umm, no. The purpose of markdown is intuitive markup that does not
    get in the way when you write but still allows simple html elements
    to be added to enhance the text. If we were only worried about
    markup we'd just use html, or maybe restuctured text, or (if truly
    masochistic) docbook. Or wikitext with '''''5 single quotes all over
    the place'''''
    <blockquote cite="mid:85e41.5012a4.3b378ca8@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4">
          <br>
          &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; Requiring unique headers is much more intrusive<br>
          &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; than somewhat ugly markup.<br>
          <br>
          maybe, but the unique headers allow anyone at all<br>
          -- even someone looking at a printout -- to know<br>
          what the unique i.d. for a given header _will_ be...<br>
          <br>
          with certainty.<br>
          <br>
          i think that's worth it.<br>
          <br>
          besides, forcing headers to be unique gives the reader<br>
          better navigational aid when they're inside the e-book.<br>
          (and remember that e-books are the focus of my work.)<br>
          a repeated header just causes confusion about location.<br>
          it's better to elaborate on the header so it gets specific.<br>
          <br>
          so, in the long run, this isn't just about links at all...<br>
          it's about making a book with a transparent structure.<br>
        </font></font></blockquote>
    Which is one of the goals of zml but not markdown. I don't really
    see an advantage to unique headers myself. That's something that can
    be handled as a post-process for generating tables of content or
    whatever.
    <blockquote cite="mid:85e41.5012a4.3b378ca8@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4">
          <br>
          <br>
          &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; Markdown extra makes a common mistake among<br>
          &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; extensions - it sacrifices readability of the plain
          text <br>
          &gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; to ensure a unique element and simplify parsing. <br>
          <br>
          it's clear that duplicated text in the file just junks it up.<br>
          so, in the abstract, i agree...&nbsp; plus z.m.l.'s readability is<br>
          far better than markdown's.&nbsp; </font></font></blockquote>
    Personally I got distracted with all the multiple blank lines so I'd
    have to disagree there.<br>
    <blockquote cite="mid:85e41.5012a4.3b378ca8@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4"> but, again for discussion,<br>
          i say "readability of the plain text" is highly over-rated.<br>
          <br>
          simply because nobody's gonna read the markdown file.<br>
        </font></font></blockquote>
    I do all the time, that's why I use markdown. Probably the main
    reason.<br>
    <blockquote cite="mid:85e41.5012a4.3b378ca8@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4">
          <br>
          the only reason you added the markdown cruft is so that<br>
          the content can be turned into .html.&nbsp; so read that .html.<br>
          why should the reader "imagine" big bold headers when<br>
          s/he can view rendered headers that _are_ big and bold?<br>
        </font></font></blockquote>
    Not the ONLY reason, no. It also provides visual clues to the source
    when read. I can easily distinguish headers and lists in the source
    text. If I was only reading the rendered pages I wouldn't be so
    worried about the readability of the source.
    <blockquote cite="mid:85e41.5012a4.3b378ca8@aol.com" type="cite"><font
        face="arial,helvetica"><font color="#000000" face="Lucida
          Grande" lang="0" size="4">
          <br>
          the reason light-markup is cool is not better readability,<br>
          but better _edit-ability_.&nbsp; markup of any kind is obtrusive.<br>
          and intrusive.&nbsp; it's an obstacle, one that gums up editing.<br>
          put the focus where it belongs -- on editing, not reading.<br>
        </font></font></blockquote>
    I agree that too much markup gums up the editing - and especially
    the composing. Less is more. In general light markup is "cool"
    because it allows "cool" writing and editing without using html for
    those who can't be bothered. It's not why I use markdown and I don't
    really care if it's cool or not. I don't have a blog that I use a
    light markup for. I don't have a public website that I keep updated
    using a light markup for content. I just organize my own personal
    offline information using it. And in general, except for tables I
    find vanilla markdown just right.<br>
  </body>
</html>