<div>
            <div>
                <span>It seems to me that your syntax, compared to Maruku's attribute lists, is less powerful, less commonly implemented, and more ambiguous; and that its only upshot is looking better to your eyes.<div><br></div><div>Fair enough? Or am I missing something?</div></span>
                <span><br>Alan Hogan<div><div><br></div><div>http://blogic.com</div><div>contact@alanhogan.com</div></div></span>
                
                <p style="color: #a0a0a0;">On Wednesday, July 13, 2011 at 6:11 PM, David Parsons wrote:</p>
                <blockquote type="cite" style="border-left-style:solid;border-width:1px;margin-left:0px;padding-left:10px;">
                    <span><div><div><br>On Jul 13, 2011, at 1:12 PM, Alan Hogan wrote:<br><br><blockquote type="cite"><div><br>On Wednesday, July 13, 2011 at 12:54 PM, David Parsons wrote:<br><br><blockquote type="cite"><div>Adding classes &amp; ids are kind of hideous. What I did with discount<br>was to extend the []() syntax to allow class: and id: pseudo-classes<br>(like [postoffice](class:caps) or version [2.1.0](id:v2.1.0) on spans<br></div></blockquote></div></blockquote><br><blockquote type="cite"><div>I can’t say I am a fan of this syntax, simply because it uses the  <br>same exact syntax for hyperlinks as it does for attributes.<br></div></blockquote><br>     Yes, that's by design.<br><br><blockquote type="cite"><div>The only way to tell about a `mailto:` link and a `class:` attribute  <br>is by whitelisting either attributes or protocols (I'm guessing  <br>attributes, as protocols are more "unbounded" in quantity). But what  <br>about obscure attributes? Or `data-foo-bar` attributes? Would (are)  <br>they be supported in this syntax?<br></div></blockquote><br>     Personally, I've not found much use for passing arbitrary  <br>attributes<br>into spans or divs, and, at least to the best of my knowledge, no user<br>has ever asked for that capacity.   So it's never been an issue.  And<br>even if it was, I worry about supporting the thing making markdown into<br>an unreadable mess -- I chose pseudo-protocols for spans because it's a<br>syntax we've already got, and it makes it no more messy.<br><br><br><blockquote type="cite"><div>More seriously, what if a new technology takes off that uses a  <br>protocol designated `id` or similar? Say, a standards-based personal  <br>identity URL, e.g. id:alanhogan? Then the two sets of meanings would  <br>overlap.<br></div></blockquote><br>     But it hasn't.   And if it does, there's certainly nothing stopping<br>me from depreciating the pseudo-protocol in future releases of the code;<br>the nice thing about syntax extensions is that they're understood to be<br>somewhat experimental and may change to reflect changes in the  <br>underlying<br>standards.<br><br><blockquote type="cite"><div><br>That said, the ability to apply attributes to spans is pretty cool.  <br>Naïvely, I would think a syntax like<br><br>      blah blah [postoffice]{: .caps}<br></div></blockquote><br>      One advantage of using pseudo-protocols is that you can use them  <br>for<br>the traditional footnote-style link:<br><br>       [postoffice][caps]<br><br>       [caps]: class:caps 'ALL UPPER CASE, ALL THE TIME'<br><br>      You could, of course, subvert the (markdown extra?)-style  <br>abbreviation<br>syntax to do it silently:<br><br>       postoffice<br><br>       %[postoffice]: [postoffice](class:caps)<br><br>       (or %[postoffice]: [postoffice]{:.caps}, if squiggle-parens are  <br>your thing)<br><br><br>      -david parsons<br>_______________________________________________<br>Markdown-Discuss mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Markdown-Discuss@six.pairlist.net">Markdown-Discuss@six.pairlist.net</a><br><a href="http://six.pairlist.net/mailman/listinfo/markdown-discuss">http://six.pairlist.net/mailman/listinfo/markdown-discuss</a><br></div></div></span>
                
                
                
                
                </blockquote>
                
                <div>
                    <br>
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>