&gt; If held, the ORG need a concil to discuss standard, and a website to<br>
&gt; publish standard. I think most of the author who implemented markdown<br>
&gt; converter in any language could be the concil member, not only the original<br>
&gt; author (Because he has not been maintaining the syntax for so long time.).<br clear="all"><br>What impact would you expect (or require) this to have on the current varied Markdown<br>implementations? I&#39;m not sure that creating a bureaucracy in this manner would help<br>
all that much - yes, you could perhaps evolve a standard after substantial discussion,<br>but what next?<br><br>The current implementations serve a purpose for the authors, and the fact that they<br>are all somewhat different is a reflection of the use that the authors put them to. A<br>
new standard would either (1) be a subset of all the existing implementations, or (2)<br>a combination of all available options.<br><br>(1) is not going to work for those who use existing conversion tools and rely on the<br>
features that your standard doesn&#39;t support. Why should they change what they need<br>just because a committee says so?<br><br>(2) is, frankly, going to be a mess. Your committee would have to choose between<br>different syntax for very similar features, and that&#39;s going to alienate some of the<br>
development community.<br><br>The likely outcome is (3) a supported feature list, more than minimal, less than the<br>total. Somewhere between (1) and (2) above. And then, what about those who really<br>want features not on your committee&#39;s list?<br>
<br>I have some sympathy with what you&#39;re trying to achieve, but I don&#39;t think that a<br>committee (which will inherently have no power) is the answer. I&#39;d be interested to<br>hear other opinions though.<br><br>
Regards,<br>Paul<br>-- <br>&quot;Software - secure, cheap, quick - choose any two&quot;<br>