<div dir="ltr">On Fri, Jul 11, 2014 at 3:58 AM, John MacFarlane <<a href="mailto:jgm@berkeley.edu">jgm@berkeley.edu</a>> :<br><br><div>><br>><br>> Here is some math: \\(e=mc^2\\).<br>><br>><br>> Here's my current list of extensions/variations (from the pandoc<br>

> source code).  Of course, it's nowhere near exhaustive:<br>><br>>      Ext_footnotes           -- ^ Pandoc/PHP/MMD style footnotes<br>>    | Ext_inline_notes        -- ^ Pandoc-style inline notes<br>>    | Ext_pandoc_title_block  -- ^ Pandoc title block<br>

>    | Ext_yaml_metadata_block -- ^ YAML metadata block<br><br><br>As much as admirable pandoc is, testing that is difficult.<br><br>Given that features can nested, the combinations is easily greater<br>than the number of lines in <br>

<br><a href="https://github.com/jgm/pandoc/blob/master/tests/Tests/Readers/Markdown.hs">https://github.com/jgm/pandoc/blob/master/tests/Tests/Readers/Markdown.hs</a><br><br>Markdown is an over-loaded term. It is safe to say that,<br>

there are at-least two useful Markdowns<br><br>1) Plain <br><br>    Useful for,<br><br>    * Non-technical publishing<br>    * Simple comment systems<br><br>( Markdown.pl )<br>       <br>2) Complete<br><br>    * DocBook / Latex style publishing</div>

<div>    * Editors<br><br>( MultiMarkdown )</div><div><br></div><div>A third type of Markdown can be labelled "Proprietary Markdown",</div><div>of which Github Markdown is a prime example.</div><div><br></div><div>

Markdown implementations can give pre-processors and post-processors,</div><div>which can implement "Proprietary Extensions".</div><div><br></div><div>I don't understand why different things have to be conflated together.</div>

<div><br></div><div>If the IETF draft is from the perspective of publishing 1) can be ignored.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div>